Name: Anonymous 2017-06-28 6:16

Discuss.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 7:33

>>118
but I'm talking about you're mom, not I'm mom

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 7:44

>>119
You must not covet your neighbor’s wife, male or female servant, ox or donkey, or anything else that belongs to your neighbor.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 7:45

>>120
shut up and give me your donkey already

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 7:45

also please check my repeating digits

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 8:05

>>122
The result came as positive.
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Name: Cudder !cXCudderUE 2017-03-04 4:12

int kod(int *cnts, int i, int *j, int *k, int nsyms) {
int r;
if(*k > nsyms || i > *j && cnts[*j] < cnts[*k]) {
r = cnts[*j];
cnts[(*j)++] = i;
} else
r = cnts[(*k)++];
return r;
}

int huff(int *cnts, int nsyms) {
int i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
for(i=0;i<nsyms-1;i++)
cnts[i] = kod(cnts, i, &j, &k, nsyms) + kod(cnts, i, &j, &k, nsyms);
cnts[i] = 2;
j = i-1;
k = j;
while(k) {
while(j > 0 && cnts[j-1] >= k)
j--;
cnts[i--] -= k - j;
cnts[i] = (k - j)*2;
k = j;
}
return nsyms - i;
}
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 6:11

>>99
So where are they? Can't see anything.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 6:17

theyr'e here: >>99. and also there: >>100

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 6:19

>>101
I don't see anything out of norm.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 6:21

>>102
you're a dubs-blind mental midget. or maybe a turd-pusher. or maybe a STACKBOI RETOID. one of those.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 6:24

>>103
Your ableist mentality is disgusting. Though, i'm not blimd, my vision is fine and i don't suffer from mental deficiencies.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 11:43

And I'm not saying that because of those cute ``animations'' & ``interactivity'' people do with it, but aids like this: http://wiki.c2.com/?ClosuresConsideredHarmful

What the hell compels people to make JS used to display their site???
It just seems like a very bad design choice and would affect their site's usability, yet I see this a lot.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 17:37

Also, dubs

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 17:48

>>32
>static
Takes 3 minutes to load: 100% CPU.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 1:42

>>34
works fine for me.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 2:07

>>31
It's not about JS and the article is quite bad, actually. You're better off not reading it.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 2:25

>>36
Most articles are written from the perspective of enterprise appers with design-pattern mentality.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 3:13

"Richard, name one person who bought your software"
RMS does emotional tirade on free as in freedom
"Just one person, richard".
RMS gets a bit angry,starts to tell me how GPL is compatible with commercial software and there are enterprise users.
"Do you have to bring it all up? just name one customer who paid you"
RMS starts getting visibly upset, goes on tirade on GPL superiority and that it COULD be sold with source code.
"Your site sells plush toys, but no software. Is it that hard to sell?"
RMS gets red in the face, start shouting insults, telling me i'm an idiot and that that GNU site isn't meant to sell software.
"You could start an app store anytime, GPL is fine with selling code, you already sell stuff. How come ..."
Dream ends as RMS bodyslams me and trying to punch me.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 3:17

https://shop.fsf.org/collection/gnu-gear (the plush toy is the stuffed gnu)

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 13:50

>>2
Buying any product there goes to supporting communism

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 15:10

lol

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 1:46

Cute dream, OP.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-07 3:15

Paul Graham says languages he ``cavalierly dismissed'' before he ``even tried writing programs in'' ``have been bad'' and ``just smelled wrong'' because in his brain, they were ``designed for other people to use'', despite the creators of these languages being their biggest promoters. This is the mentality of a mental midget.

Historically, languages designed for other people to use have been bad: Cobol, PL/I, Pascal, Ada, C++. The good languages have been those that were designed for their own creators: C, Perl, Smalltalk, Lisp.

It may seem cavalier to dismiss a language before you've even tried writing programs in it. But this is something all programmers have to do. There are too many technologies out there to learn them all. You have to learn to judge by outward signs which will be worth your time. I have likewise cavalierly dismissed Cobol, Ada, Visual Basic, the IBM AS400, VRML, ISO 9000, the SET protocol, VMS, Novell Netware, and CORBA, among others. They just smelled wrong.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 19:10

Common Lisp is Blub.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 22:08

Lisp teaches you a lot of things. It teaches you to judge languages based solely on their syntax: if it uses nothing but parenthesis, it's a lisp and it's good, if it uses syntax, it's a C-like and it's bad. It teaches you that Perl, C, and Ruby are all the same, because they all have syntax.
It teaches you to use Emacs, and furthermore it teaches you that Unix is bad because it thrived where Lisp didn't. It teaches you that the Unix style of doing things is plain wrong and bound to be filled with inconsistencies, an ill of which Lisp is exempt of.
It teaches you that you should write your code to run in 100 years, and that therefore you should avoid programming with threads or network sockets. Lisp teaches you to have some historical perspective, and TCP/IP won't be around much longer (I'm saying more than 60 years).
Lisp teaches you that the worth of a programmer is not in their skill but in the tools their use.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 23:22

>>8
not really because all of the good lisp stuff was made by skilled programmers

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 23:26

>>9
all of the good lisp stuff
Doesn't exist.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-20 0:12

>>8
Paul Graham says that Perl and C are good and that Cobol, PL/I, Pascal, Ada, and Visual Basic are bad. He says C++ is bad, and it is, because all C-based languages are bad. Paul Graham is also a fan of Unix and loathes Windows.

He called up his old programming partner from Harvard, Robert Morris, and interested him in the idea of collaborating on their own startup, even though Graham had no clue where they would start or what they would develop; eventually, they decided they would try to write software that would enable a business to generate an online store. Once they were clear about the concept, they had to confront a very large obstacle in their way. In those days, for a program to be popular enough it would have to be written for Windows. As consummate hackers, they loathed everything about Windows and had never bothered to learn how to develop applications for it. They preferred to write in Lisp and have the program run on Unix, the open-source operating system.
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Name: Anonymous 2016-08-18 6:22

http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/08/code-dumped-online-came-from-omnipotent-nsa-tied-hacking-group/
https://xorcatt.wordpress.com/2016/08/16/equationgroup-tool-leak-extrabacon-demo/
Once again, a buffer overflow has lead to new vulnerabilities in C land. This time all pre-2013 Cisco routers are affected.

It does indeed feel there is a gaping hole in our software stack as these buffer overflows are only increasing in rapidity. It is time we take a serious look at the epidemic of exploits in C land, and begin to implement real solutions; they are out there.

It’s hard to deny that easy access to stack, especially unpriveleged access, plays a serious role in creating computer crime. How many buffer overflows happen in languages with access checks on stacks? How many buffer overflows are discovered in the Ada each year? None. How many in Haskell? None. How many in Java? None. The list could go on. And yet, mass exploitation in the C-land continue to increase. There is certainly a correlation. But there are other important causes at play as well: the language is an ill-designed clusterfuck of hacks upon hacks.

Of course, mass buffer overflows are only one indication of the security nightmare that plagues the language — the whole language is built on unsafe and insecure code. In the C-land, memory rules are much more lax than that of other popular languages, on par with the assembly and lacking even basic safety features: unless explictly requested by the programmer.

Nearly 70% pre-2013 routers are Cisco and are vulnerable to being hacked during the %CurrentYear%.
https://gigaom.com/2013/02/27/chart-cisco-owns-the-switching-and-routing-world/

These are a only a few of the indicators of what may feed into the hopelessness and despair that causes so much distrust in C and its derivatives. The bugs cost real money and real work-hours to be wasted on correcting and debugging the garbage that was compiled by compilers which don't value anything but speed and memory use..
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 23:28

>>124
Undefined behavior.

Name: Cudder !cXCudderUE 2017-07-18 2:23

>>123
"Humans are the problem. They can do things wrong. Let's eliminate humans."

I can't find the author nor does a quick search yield any results, but here's a relevant quote I remember rather well:

"Those who are obliged to make nooses would do well to not make them too strong, for they may someday find themselves inside one."

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 8:07

>>125
False

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 0:31

>>123

int main() {
return 1;
}

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-19 17:45

>>3
Forth.
In any case where C fits, Forth can do the job just as well or even better.
With the exception of a Unix kernel.
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[7:5]

DQN DQN LOL

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 10:46

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 11:10

DQN? Never heard of it, I swear.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 16:08

tl;dr

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 16:24

>>3
best "Derp learning" bot using latest DQN framework managed to play some atari game.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 18:04

>>4
thanks
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 5:10

PROGRAMMING IS ALL VERY WELL BUT WHAT KIND OF LIFE IS IT WITHOUT HEART? THIS BOARD HAS PROGRAMMING BUT NO LOVE EXPRESSED. LET US CHANGE THAT RIGHT NOW ;)
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 11:46

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 11:54

10 inches of warm sticky love

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 11:56

11 inches of warm sticky dubs

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 12:17

Human genome - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_genome
The human genome is the complete set of nucleic acid sequence for humans (Homo sapiens), ... See also: Lists of human genes by chromosome. The total length of the human genome is over 3 billion base pairs. The genome is organized into ...
Genome size‎: ‎3,234.83 Mb (Mega-basepairs) ...
Ploidy‎: ‎diploid
Number of chromosomes‎: ‎23 pairs

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 13:49

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[9:12]

Quiz

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 5:14

Q:What takes more energy:
a.Increment a number from 0 to 2^128-1 using 2^128 increment instructions, with a CPU running at 3GHZ at exact 50 Joules/Seconds(50watt).
b.boil off the oceans on Earth.(defined as 5.58072e30 Joules)
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 12:08

>>6
The problem you can't "just increment a counter" you need the whole CPU for this to work(hence 50Watts)

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 16:18

>>8
As long as you're paying the electric bill for the next 3,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years, go ahead and use a CPU. Personally, I'd go with an ASIC on this.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 8:10

Yet 128 bit keys in symmetric cryptography is still weak.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 10:29

>>10
Thats because bruteforcing isn't used. More effective techniques lower the computational complexity by many orders of magnitude.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-18 11:12

>>11
With enough ciphertexts you can easily brute-force and recover some 128 bit keys.
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-16 19:09

https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/16/death-to-c/
When will it become illegal to program in C?
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Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 0:32

Long live almighty Java™.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 1:32

I'll switch to Rust when Cudder starts using it.

Name: Cudder !cXCudderUE 2017-07-17 2:37

The imperfection of computer software reflects the imperfection of human nature and society as a whole. If we keep trying to "fix" that imperfection by imposing more constraints on programs, and thus eventually the lives that they control, we will essentially kill off humanity.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 6:56

The perfection of dubs reflects the perfection of repeating digits and mathematics as a whole.

Name: Anonymous 2017-07-17 23:39

>>10
``There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why? I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?''
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